Outfit Your Expedition with Exped Equipment

Heads up, Outdoor EXPEDition-ers, you can now find a new line of products at ACK to Outfit Your Adventure from Exped, an innovative company that’s been designing products for the casual hiker to the technical climber since 1997. Swiss based, Exped has slowly been making a name for themselves in the States and we aren’t surprised if you haven’t heard of them.

Exped prides themselves in their long list of industry firsts, awards and patents and have a history in ingenious simplicity in all of their products. Need some examples? The Exped Orion Tent is one of their first creations. The Orion combines the styles of a tunnel tent with that of a dome tent into what they call a ridge tunnel tent. If you’re not familiar with the different styles of tents, what this really means is that the Orion combines usable space and freestanding capability unlike most tents. If you’re looking for a new lightweight tent with plenty of storage space for gear that can also handle some tough weather – check this one out.

And anyone can see the innovation of Exped’s DreamWalker Sleeping Bag. Ok, sure, it kind of looks like an oversized snuggie and you’re probably asking yourself why anyone would think to bring this on a real camping trip. First impressions aside, this thing is packed with function that we bet anyone can find useful out in the field. Just watch this video:

Of course, these aren’t the only two products from Exped that we have picked up, and we encourage you to familiarize yourself with our full line of tents, sleeping bags, hammocks, sleeping pads, footprints, camping pillows and more here. I hope that you’re as excited as we are to find these unique products at ACK.com and be sure to comment below with any Exped experiences you’ve had in the past or questions about the new gear!

Joseph @ACK

Therm-a-Rest Sleeping Bags? Yes Sleeping Bags…

You read that right, Therm-a-Rest, the kings of the sleeping pad have just released a new line of sleeping bags and they are stout. From the 750+ fill goose down 0°F Altair (Read:Really Warm) to the 40°F Regulus Blanket they’ve got you covered…literally. The general premise behind the line seems to be warm, light and packable – directed at folks heading up the mountains and into the backcountry, whether it be on foot or on skis. Some interesting and innovative designs, especially the Navis 20-45°F hybrid bag featuring sewn-through construction in the upper half of the bag, which then layers easily over a lightweight parka or pullover. The 20-45 rating depends on the jacket that it is combined with.  If you are heading out into the cold this winter and want to sleep as snug as a bug in a rug, check out the new line.

Steve @ACK

Devil’s River Part 2

This is Part 2 (click here for Part 1)  of my series on our Devil’s River kayak trip.

I think one of the worst things about any trip, vacation, or adventure is not knowing what to pack or getting there and wishing you had brought something.  Since I just went through this experience on a recent trip down the Devils River in West Texas, I wanted to share with you what gear worked and didn’t work for us.  Remember what worked for us may not work for you.  Bear and I were Marine Corpsman and Kevin is smarter than MacGyver, so do your homework before setting out into the wild.

When planning a trip, I make sure food, water, shelter, fire, and safety are covered first and foremost.  For food, I first find a Tupperware like container with a lid that seals really nice for a bowl.  This way you can also use it for a semi-dry storage container and you don’t spill anything while you eat.  I also picked up this handy new super spork by Light My Fire.  This was a great piece of gear and survived a pretty harsh trip.  Since you can’t have a fire along the river, we took parts from an old Whisperlite stove I had.  After realizing the burner was missing, I had to pick up a new one.  It worked out great because we found out the fuel mechanism can’t be submerged for long periods or it might not work.  So make sure you put it in something that will keep it nice and dry.

The water containers we carried were Nalgene and Camelbak bottles along with Camelbak packs.  They all worked perfect.  Even though the river has fresh water springs and aquifers pumping into it, we took a water filter that stopped working halfway through the trip.  Go figure.  Get a good water filter!  I also happened to leave my emergency Iodine tablets in the truck.  Drinking river water is not ideal, but I would rather get Giardia than a heat injury.  As for shelter, I have a high-end Kelty tent that has worked great over the years for me.  Any tent will work, however, you really want a tent that has a lot of ventilation, light weight (preferably under 10 lbs), has a great rain fly, and will fit in/on your kayak.

Unless you’re some one of the caliber of Bear Grylls (the guy from Man vs. Wild) you’re going to need a mat to sleep on.  I used a basic $30 Therm-a-rest which worked fine, but a more compact and softer one would have been nice.  As far as a sleeping bag, I recommend you make sure you have a higher end bag that is quick drying.  A cotton or down bag is worthless because they are bulky and if they get wet it acts more like a weight than a sleeping bag.  I also keep it in a waterproof Sealine bag to keep it extra dry.

When doing a long trip through a harsh and dangerous environment you will also need to make sure you have enough medical supplies.  Those dinky medical kits that have Band-Aids, cheap plastic tweezers, and chap stick are not going to cut it. Make sure you have proper medical supplies to treat multiple injuries for multiple days and that you know how to use it.  We had a couple of close calls and the opportunity is there for some pretty gnarly injuries.

In the next blog, I will go over additional gear we took and talk about what worked and didn’t work.  I would also like to say one more thing.  We met some pretty fantastic people on our little adventure that went out of their way to help us.  Kevin, Bear and I would like to say thank you to all those folks.  As for everyone else, make an effort do something nice for someone.  Not only will you bring happiness into their life, but also into your own.  In these times who couldn’t use a little extra happiness.

Marcus Harleson
ACK Pro Staff