The Ten Essentials: Part 3 of 3

okokokWelcome to the 3rd and final portion of the Ten Essentials series, providing insight into wilderness preparedness since March 13, 2015. If you are just visiting us without having seen the previous two posts (The Ten Essentials: Part One, The Ten Essentials: Part Two) do whatever catching up you feel appropriate for expanding your own outdoor education.

As stated in The Ten Essentials: Part One “The group that originated The Ten Essentials in 1930 was a Seattle-based organization for climbers and outdoor adventurers called “The Mountaineers”. The list was constructed by the team to help like-minded individuals with preparation in case of outdoor emergencies. Throughout the years the list has been reconfigured and today it is currently in its eighth edition.”

The final four items on our list include: Repair Kit and Tools, Nutrition and Extra Food, Hydration, and Emergency Shelter. Here, I will go into detail on why these items are so important for backcountry trekking and everyday life as well as unveil the best products for each category.

kjnkjjn7. Repair Kit and Tools

Emergency repair kit‘s are important for obvious situations, but also when you plan on preparing food like fresh caught fish your kit can prove to be the difference between eating and going hungry for the weekend. Creating your own kit designed around your specific adventures is also an available option. When weekend camping or fishing, a simple and basic kit is typically more than enough, and opting for this simple yet inclusive kit will save you weight and time in the long run. Some people will choose to add duct tape, super glue, and their own personal hunting/fishing knives depending. The repair kits are significantly different from medical kits in the way that they are more oriented towards dealing with gear related matters as opposed to medical issues.

glkdsm8. Nutrition and Extra Food

Freeze-dried and dehydrated foods don’t typically sound appealing unless you are backcountry-level starving, and this may not be my opinion alone, but more of a universal standard. If you are out on the trail for a long enough period of time where fresh food will begin to spoil, Backpackers Pantry is the industry standard and best place to go for all of your hunger needs (mostly because you’ll grow ill if you attempt to live on trail mix and candy bars for more than a day or so). When you have the option of choosing between Beef Stroganoff with Wild Mushrooms, Chicken Cashew Curry, and Mocha Mousse Pie, you’ll never go back to ordinary freeze dried options again. The only ingredient you need beside the packet itself is, of course, water. No-cook items including energy bars/gels, nuts, dried fruits, or jerky are always great snacks for before and after mealtime.

water-poured-into-glass9. Hydration

Depending on the length of your trip we typically recommend bringing with you a Water Purifier Stainless Steel water bottle, and a Reservoir. When planning out your journey it’s important to chart out oasis’s where there are available sources of water beforehand so that you have an idea where to fill up and if bringing your purifier is necessary. Typically, if you are off the grid for more than a weekend, you should consider bringing your purifier for safety purposes, just in case the “available water sources” no longer exist or are not functional. In everyday life Stainless Steel bottles are the way to go if you are looking for high performance taste, durability, and if you seek something that has proven to withstand the test of time stylistically.

jkjkn10. Continue reading The Ten Essentials: Part 3 of 3

Boat Pinned? Learn the Z-Drag

Boat pinned in fast moving water? Learn the Z-Drag System. With a length of rope, a few carabiners, and a couple of slings you can quickly set up a simple system to free a pinned canoe, kayak or raft.

Tie a loop in the end of your throw bag and attach this to a central point on the boat with a carabiner if possible. There will be significant force so make sure the attachment point is sturdy and that the carabiner is load rated. Throw the bag of rope to shore. Loop a sling around a tree, pole, rock or some other secure object (this will be your fixed anchor) and secure the sling to itself with another carabiner.  Pass the rope from your throw bag through this carabiner. Using another sling make a Prusik knot on the rope as close to the pinned boat as possible and attach a carabiner here and pass the rope through this carabiner. To ensure that you don’t lose ground once you begin pulling, add another Prusik knot to the rope between the fixed anchor and the boat, attaching this to the anchor sling with a carabiner. This will act as a brake should you lose your grip.

Steve@ACK

Hollywood Films That May Help You Survive in the Wild?

I came across an interesting article this morning via the Outdoor Hub by James Swan. The author wrote about five movies that may actually provide some outdoor survival pointers many of which he though may actually be useful in real world scenarios. I have personally seen all five movies which and agree, they indeed may help you survive in the wild — keyword “may”.

To read the article, click here: Five Hollywood Films That Can Actually Help You Survive in the Wild

Roland @ACK