Unwrapping New Kayak Colors from Wilderness Systems

New warehouse labels for the new colors.
New warehouse labels for the new colors.

Not too long ago Wilderness Systems announced that they’d be testing out some new kayak colors and eventually choosing their favorite(s) to add to production for the long term. The colors included three different camo colors and are available with the Ride 115, Pungo 120 and the Tarpon 120. The camo colors include orange & black, red & black and a blue & black.

Well, these beauties arrived today at the warehouse and we wanted to give you a first look at the results. These are now available to ship but will be offered for a limited time only! Check them out:

 

Quest for a Kayak Ends at Tarpon 120

I have been on a quest the past few months. No, not for hunting dragons, but for a kayak. I have tried out tons of different models from sit insides to sit on tops and have even had a chance in the Hobie Adventure Island. I was being somewhat picky on the model of kayak I wanted, and was trying to find one that I could paddle around Austin and occasionally take down to the coast. After a few months of trying out different models I think I might have finally found the right kayak for me.

Recently, I went down to Lake Bastrop with Kristian (Austin store‘s assistant manager) and we brought with us some of new boats for me to try and paddle around. I soon found myself in the Wilderness Systems Tarpon 120 along with our Werner Camano Fiberglass paddle. I enjoyed the tracking, maneuverability and stability of the Tarpon 120. It was a quick boat, especially with the Camano fiber glass paddle I was using. I was able to cover most of Lake Bastrop during my paddle.

The Werner Camano series is hands down one of my favorite paddles. Unfortunately, unless I earn a huge raise, the carbon fiber paddle is out of my price range, which is why I tried out the fiberglass Camano. I feel the Camano FG was a good middle of the road paddle as it is tougher and stiffer than a nylon paddle but it will not break the bank like a carbon fiber paddle will. Also the low profile button system on all the Werner Paddles made it very easy to feather my paddles on the water.

Here’s my final word: the Tarpon 120 and the Werner Camano FG go well together like chili cheese and tater tots.

Bill @ACK Austin

Gulf Coast Redfish Fever!

An early fall Redfish round up by Kristian Kolflat

It wasn’t my birthday weekend but it might as well have been! The late summer, early fall seasons provide some of the best redfish fishing here on the Texas coast. So good, that before I can even finish making my plans to hit the coast, I usually come down with a serious bout of “redfish fever” — it’s the only thing on my mind. My last trip was fairly eventful but in an effort to enlighten others with the same experience, I brought along two longtime friends with the hopes of catching some big ones and having a whole lot of fun….and that we did.

Kristian proudly showing his catch for the day

During the fall months, redfish begin to group together into schools for feeding, mating and seasonal movement before winter. Over time, anglers have caught on to this annual “run” and they themselves begin to school into the back bays, flats and jetties along the coastline. Not only is the fishing phenomenal but the beaches tend to be free of seaweed, the water warm and crystal clear, and aside from fellow anglers and paddlers, there are far fewer people in the area. I personally consider this to be one of the best times of the year to be there, so off we were.

Before we left, I had to deal with the fact that my midsize SUV could only hold one or maybe two kayaks at a time but by utilizing a Thule Stacker, I was able to load all three Wilderness Systems Tarpon 120’s with room to spare for one more. We (and our kayaks) arrived safely and it was time to wet our lines.

Day One:
We launched into one of the many back bays with live shrimp and fresh dead menhaden as bait and paddled about a mile and half before reaching the cut, leading to a destination that always proves to hold a few fish. My comrades were impatiently excited and begin to fish before we even get out of the channel. Despite the fact that I am trying to shake off this “redfish fever”, I patiently paddle on a little farther and find a shallow point at the intersection of three waterways. I toss a shrimp under a popping cork and within a few seconds, BAM the fever is broken and I have my first keeper on the stringer!

Kristian and his buddy enjoying another successful day

As the day went on, we split up and explored the bay each on our own, all secretly wishing to find the best fishing hole first. I spotted a small school of reds just under the bow of my yak so decided to quietly drop anchor and cast a few lines out. Glad I did because from this point on, every time my friends looked over my way, my rod was doubled over — this was quite possibly one of the best fishing days I have ever experienced in a kayak. I caught my limit in reds released the rest and even landed a few small trout, a bonnethead shark, a large mullet, skipjack, pin-perch and absolutely no hardheads or stingrays. What more could an angler ask for? A few redfish also made it onto my buddy’s kayaks but before we knew it, the south wind picked up and it was time to head back home.

As I was getting beat in a game of horseshoes on the beach, I wondered if the next day would be as good? No way, not possible. Two awesome days of fishing in a row? Never.

Day Two:
After two seconds of discussion a unanimous vote puts us back in the exact same waters as the previous day. However, as noon rolled around nobody caught anything and our hopes were fading fast. We did see some fellow anglers in the distance catching reds all morning long. No luck for us so we decided it was time to stalk the flats on foot. With my kayak anchored down, I began wading in about four feet of water and threw two lines out. Once again BAM! One doubles over, I set the hook but I miss. I reload, shoot again but this time I’m fighting what I believe is a keeper. The sky brightens, the clouds clear and the fear of going home empty-handed on day two begins to subside. The tide turns and so does the fishing. I turn around to scope out the horizon only to be greeted with two reels zipping away — both mine. I grab one and then the other, set both hooks and perform an awkward dance of holding and alternating between two fighting redfish shooting through the water like bullets. Game on! In the background, my two friends and what seemed like everyone else on the flat is cheering me on like it’s the game of the season and the last shot determines the championship. It turns out that one of the two fish was a half-inch too short so I released her. However, within a few minutes my rod doubled over again and once again, I finished off the day with a full stringer. That night, we enjoyed fresh redfish, fried and blackened at Jay’s Seafood and Spaghetti Works in Port Aransas, Texas.

The trip was over far too quickly and instead of curing my “redfish fever” it simply spiked it even more. So much that I’m considering heading right back down for another weekend of phenomenal fall fishing in Texas soon. If you ever get a chance to visit the area during this time of the year, I high recommend it and be sure to bring your kayak or rent one from one of our stores.

Kristian @ACK Austin

P.S. We couldn’t leave without first walking down the jetties to see what others were catching and knowing that it’s a good time of the year for catching bull reds in the surf. Sure enough, we saw a lot of them being caught. I enjoy keeping a few fish for dinner here and there but these larger reds are not good for eating and are in prime spawning age groups. Here is some age/size information to use before you consider eating that 35-year-old bottom feeding fish that just gave you the fight of a lifetime. Take a picture, throw it back!

Redfish Age and Size*
1 year = up to 15″
2-5 year = 15-29″
6-10 year = 29-38″
11-35 year = 38-44″

*These are rough estimates from a variety of resources. Accurately determining age can be difficult due to habitat, gender, health and a variety of other factors.

No More Holes! Attaching Kayak Accessories Without Drilling

SlideTrax System

I’ve always noticed that we sell a large number  Wilderness System’s Tarpon series and the Native Manta Ray series kayaks here at the San Marcos store. One of the many reasons these kayaks sell so well, especially among anglers, is their patented accessory attachment systems. These innovations make it easy for paddlers to add and remove accessories by simply mounting them on a pre-installed track or “rail” systems.

For example, in 2009 Wilderness Systems offered the SlideTrax system on the Tarpon 120, 140 and 160.  The concept was new and innovative and over the past two years, it has expanded from simple mounting plates to items such as the SlideTrax Anchor Trolley and Transducer Deployment Arm for fish finders. The SlideTrax rail system now comes standard on the Commander series as well. The SlideTrax system also incorporates tie downs, which can be used to secure items in the tank well.

Groove Accessory Attachment System

In 2010, Native Watercraft announced the Groove Accessory Attachment System. They offer two different sized plates, the rectangular plate (16″ x 5″) and the square plate (6″ x 5″), which can be attached to the Groove System. These plates allow for a wide variety of attachments and as long as an accessory can be attached to the plate with (nuts and bolts) the variations are unlimited. The Groove Accessory Attachment System is now offered on the 2011 Native Ultimate series as well.

These accessory attachment systems are great for paddlers who don’t want to drill holes into the hull of the kayak, are always looking to add new accessories, enjoy a variety of activities that use different equipment and simply want the ability to remove added items for easy transport, storage and cleaning.

I am always interested in seeing how creative paddlers get when utilizing these type of systems. Share your creativity with us.

For more information, come by the store sometime or visit our website at AustinKayak.com and search for “SlideTrax” and “Groove or comment below.

Dave Graves
Assistant Manager
ACK – San Marcos