10 Reasons To Go Paddling

At ACK we love paddling for a number of reasons- but we don’t want to focus on why we are obsessed!

We took to our Facebook page and asked all of our customers what makes them want  to go out

Werner SUP Paddles
Werner SUP Paddles

paddling and got some great answers. Y’all answered with everything from waking up to getting excited about the weather hitting 55 – so we thought we’d share a few with you.

Here are some of our favorites:

  1. A bad week at work! Plus a beautiful sunny day!

  2. A good 6 inch rain

  3. When I’m out on the water all of the BS in life disappears for a while

  4. Rain, snow, sleet, hail and even sun makes me want to go paddling

  5. Work!

  6. Good weather and good friends

  7. Owning my first kayak I bought at demo day

  8. Just being out there. Fishing is fun but the joy of paddling makes it special

    Sunset Paddle
    Post-Work Paddle
  9. It’s such a peaceful and relaxing time that I get to share with my husband/wife and no other distractions

  10. Fishing!

  11. The “itch”

Of course we cant forget about some of the smart answers y’all sent in like “I don’t need no stinkin’ reason!” and “Why would you need a reason?!”

We have to give it to them though- a paddler never needs a reason to get out on the water.

Learning to Fish the Hard Way!

Brad and Grandpa Fishing

The Early Years

I have found that most people who enjoy the outdoors as adults were exposed to the joys of nature at an early age through a grandparent, uncle or parent. I however, was lucky enough to experience it with all three. I grew up hunting and fishing and enjoyed it all the way until I turned into a baseball obsessed teenager. After I discovered baseball, nature took a backseat. I had found a new passion and let that take over all of my time.

After high school I went to a college in East Texas (Go Kats!) that happened to be near a great state park and a wonderful lake. I spent many a class periods in the woods and along the shores of Lake Raven redeveloping my love of the outdoors. Unfortunately for me, not many of my fishing lessons from my childhood held over.

Back At It 

Brad Fishing @5

I quickly realized that I wanted to get back into fishing so with a credit card and a dream I made my way to a nearby big box store. While shopping I called on my past experiences with two of my grandfathers – Grandpa River (a fisherman) and Grandpa Tractor (a farmer). I fondly remember fighting reds and speckled trout with my Grandpa River, my mom’s father, and his advice when it came to line. “Hardheads will eat your line if you let them” he always said as I clung to a long rod with a heavy line attached to even heavier sinkers. “Big bait gets the big fish” was another favorite of his and everyone knows that a child will always want the biggest! So with these memories in mind, I headed down the fishing aisle of the store and purchased some familiar look fishing gear. I made my purchases and walked out carrying a brand new long, heavy and strong fishing pole, thick as steel line, and some mean looking hooks. I also grabbed some heavy sinkers, bobbers, and other “essential” fishing items. “Yep.” I thought walking out, “Grandpa River would be proud!”

After my successful trip to get my gear I headed out to the lake where my buddy and I planned to go out fishing. When I pulled up my buddy gave me a funny look and laughingly asked if i planned on catching a gator. I asked in confusion, “No, why? Are there gators near by?” I found it both funny and odd that he was laughing at me but continued to unload my gear regardless. I finished unloading after about fifteen minutes- within that time my buddy had landed two bass and a cat! I then began to fix up my rig while he laughed again at my expense as I fumbled around with my new toys.

After a few more minutes of rigging I was finally able to get my bait- worms! – in the water. I remembered that I was fishing fresh water and that dead shrimp was not the best choice for the lake- well that and the store didn’t have any. As I waited for my bobber to sink I glanced over at my buddy’s pole and gear as well as another fellow’s gear who was fishing nearby and noticed that their poles were much smaller than mine. I began to wonder why when I felt a tug on my line- not much but it was something! I jerked the rod back causing me to lose the fish. “Oh well.” I thought to myself as I re-baited and got back in the water. This time I decided to keep the bait closer to the dock and use a giant worm wrapped around my hook. I was not going to miss this time!

I slowly reeled the worm in towards the dock and let it sit almost right about against it and then WHAM! My line took off. I tightened down the line and gave it a good strong pull back and before I knew it I was yelling DUCK! That fish took off like a rocket- flying out of the water faster than you could snap your fingers. My buddy once again, could not stop laughing.

You see, what I didn’t realize was that I was drawing on memories of fishing with my Grandpa River on the Texas Coast – not a shoreline dock in East Texas lake! I had always gone saltwater fishing with heavy rods and reels made for salt and offshore fishing; hence my earlier purchases. Needless to say, my 7 ft heavy action spin reel, much like a broomstick for offshore fishing, and 60lb mono line, which might as well have been rope, was a bit overkill for catching bass and cats off a dock. That cat took my bait in what was probably about 3 feet of water and had no idea what was in store for it.

Passion Rekindled

Brad with fish

After having a good laugh with my buddy over my flying cat, I decided then and there that I needed to consider some fishing lessons and reconsider my choice in gear. I quickly realized my buddy wouldn’t be able to stop laughing long enough to re-teach me how to fish but thankfully the gentleman on the other end of the dock was more than willing to share his fishing tips and knowledge. After a short conversation with him even my laughing buddy was was taking notes. After he gave me an hour long lesson, my passion for fishing was rekindled and I had a good idea of the new gear I needed to go purchase. I had a plan and I was going to dive head first in! Before that however, I was in need of a road trip- to the coast.

Author: Brad Martin, ACK Employee

 

How to Choose the Perfect Whitewater or Touring Kayak Paddle

by Danny Mongno, Werner Paddles Marketing Manager

Werner Kayak PaddlesSelecting the perfect kayak paddle is probably the most important decision you will make as a boater. That’s because the paddle is your engine, your tool to transfer energy to the water. Choosing the proper blade shape will allow you to perform at the highest level for your style of boating, and understanding how to get the perfect fit will allow you to be more comfortable, use less energy and spend more time on the water. Although it is such an important decision, it does not have to be hard.

First of all, for either whitewater or touring paddles there are some common choices that you’ll need to make. Let’s go over them now:

Shaft options
The benefits of a straight shaft kayak paddle is that it has a familiar feel; most of us have used a straight shaft at some time and it’s what we are used to. Other benefits are lighter weight and less of an investment. If good technique is used and a paddler can hold on loosely to the paddle, focusing on grasping the shaft with the “O-Kay” symbol all day, pain-free paddling can be obtained.

Whitewater Kayak PaddleFor those who have developed some aches and pains in their hands and wrists, and for those who generally hold on too tightly to their paddle (and let’s face it, we all do when we get nervous), a neutral bent shaft kayak paddle becomes an insurance policy for your body. By always keeping the wrists in an ergonomically correct straight alignment, less pressure is put on the small tendons and ligaments of the wrist and pain is avoided. Although more of an investment, it can make all the difference for spending more time on the water. The concept of neutral bent allows for a smooth transition from your old kayak paddle, as your hand position is familiar and exactly the same as it was on your straight shaft.  The only thing that changes is that your wrists remain straight while paddling.

Shaft diameter and blade size
Both of these options are really common sense and easily determined by your body size. Folks with smaller hands and smaller bodies, should look towards the smaller diameter shaft for a more relaxed grip and a small or medium blade surface area to put less stress and strain on the body. Larger boaters, generally with larger hands, prefer the standard diameter shaft and a medium to full sized blade area, depending on their fitness level.  Remember, a kayak paddle with a bigger blade is not always going to make us more powerful, especially if we are just working too hard to move that extra size through the water. If your hand is larger than 7 inches from the base of your palm to your fingertip, you will want the standard shaft. If the length is smaller than 6.5 inches, you should use the small diameter shaft. In between, you can go either way.

Spend as much as you can afford on your kayak paddle material
Touring Kayak PaddleAs I said early on, the paddle is your engine. You will use less energy on the water, run more drops, surf more waves, paddle further and perform better if you are less tired. A paddle that is lighter to move through the stroke path, referred to as the paddle’s “swing weight,” will allow you to feel fresher as the miles and hours wear on. A kayak paddle with a stiffer material will flex less, causing less water to “escape” from the blade face and for you to use less energy in your stroke to create more motion.

Kayak paddles with higher end materials like Performance Core provide more buoyancy in the blades, which helps you brace with more confidence and roll more easily, even in the most aerated water. Sure, paddles wear over time, but so does your boat, your automobile or mountain bike tires, your tools. However, think of the performance advantages you are getting while on the water. Is your paddling enjoyment worth the investment? Well, I think that sums up how to decide what to spend…how much do you value your time on the water; how far do you want to stretch your skills?

Now, let’s take a few simple steps toward fitting you with the perfect whitewater or touring kayak paddle:

Choosing a Whitewater Kayak Paddle:

Choose the shape of your blade  based on the style of paddling you are doing.

river running kayak paddle1. River running or creek boating:

As we paddle downstream we are faced with many features: holes, waves, eddies, ledges both small and large (i.e. waterfalls). To navigate your way through these obstacles your forward stroke will be far and away the most valuable tool. A river running kayak paddle will have a larger portion of the blade shape at the upper tip, or a focus above the center line of the kayak paddle. This oversized tip allows paddlers to reach the water sooner and get instant bite at the most important part of the forward stroke, the catch. For those paddlers looking  primarily to run rivers or steeper creeks, this is your best choice.

play boating kayak paddle2. Play boating:

As the sport of whitewater kayaking has grown over the years the ways we “play” the river has expanded. For some the feeling of front surfing a glassy wave is what provides that all-day smile while others need to notify the local air traffic controller before they start their aerial assault on the river. No matter what your idea of play boating is, the proper shaped blade will help your performance. By down turning or “drooping” a play boat blade shape, with more focus of the blade surface area below the center line, the kayak paddle will engage the water sooner, allowing paddlers to perform play boat control stokes with greater ease.

3. What if you can’t decide?

If just getting to the river and enjoying your time on the water with your family and friends is your ultimate goal, with no set agenda, we say play the percentages.  What do see yourself doing the most out there? Then buy the blade that works best for that application. Remember, the proper blade shape is going to offer you maximum performance in your discipline, but that is not to say you can’t “cross train”.

Length options

Now that you have the proper blade shape for your paddling style, let’s be sure you have the perfect fit. The perfect fitting kayak paddle will assure comfort and better paddling efficiency.

1. River running kayak paddles will always be longer, again due to the importance of the “catch”. The catch is where the blade first enters the water, where you have the most energy in your stroke. So if your paddle has some extra length you will have more “catch length” and take fewer, more powerful strokes. Generally speaking, short people use 194 cm, medium people 197 cm, tall 200 cm.

2. Play boating kayak paddles tend to be shorter, as you will need to perform more dynamic paddle strokes when performing play boat maneuvers. You will also need to take much faster, higher cadence strokes as you attain upstream to catch waves or drop into holes. For a general rule of thumb, short people should look to a 191 cm, medium at 194 cm and those long folks 197 cm.

Choosing a Touring Kayak Paddle:

Angled Paddling

Choose the shape of your blade based on the style of paddling you are doing.

low angle kayak paddle1. Low angle = “more options”:

Most people enjoy the low angle style of paddling. Low angle paddles have longer and narrower blades designed to pull through each stroke with the right amount of surface area for good power while maintaining a smooth forward stroke. The low angle stroke puts your hands at about shoulder height, is more relaxed and puts significantly less pressure on your upper body, arms and shoulders.

high angle kayak paddle2. High angle = “more commitment to technique but far better tracking”:

This is typically a more aggressive style of paddling with a faster cadence and a larger variety of strokes being used on each paddle outing. By focusing on keeping your top hand about forehead height as you take your stroke you will notice the blade travels closer to the kayak. With the blade traveling in this path your boat will track significantly better and go straighter. Werner’s wider, shorter blade shape puts more surface area of the blade into the water in this position. This does place more emphasis on proper torso rotation since more pressure can be put on your shoulders in this higher angle paddling style. The commitment is worth it though for those looking to take their paddling to a higher performance level in longer, sleeker, light touring and touring kayaks.

3. What if you can’t decide?

What do see yourself doing the most out there?  Look at the boat you’re paddling and your goals in the sport and then buy the blade that works best for that application. Remember, the proper blade shape is going to offer you maximum performance in your discipline.

Length Options

Now that you have the proper blade shape for your paddling style, let’s be sure you have the perfect fit. The perfect fitting paddle will assure comfort and paddling efficiency.

1. Low angle kayak paddle

Here are some easy to follow rules:

  • 6 ft or under, use 220 cm.
  • 6’1″ and over, use 230 cm.
  • If you kayak is over 28″ wide, add 10 cm to the length of the paddle, after you choose based on your height.

2. High angle kayak paddle

Here are some easy to follow rules:

  • 6 ft and under, use 210 cm.
  • 6’1″ and over, use 215 cm.
  • Kayak width general does not come into play since most high-angle paddlers are in more narrow light touring and touring kayaks.

If you have questions about boating styles or kayak paddle choices, give the folks at ACK a call, 888-828-3828, or email at customer@austinkayak.com.

Happy paddling!

 

Yak Gear Announces US Distribution of Viking Kayaks

The Vikings are coming!  The Vikings are coming!

Yak Gear is proud to announce the United States distribution of Viking Kayaks, a New Zealand based kayak manufacturer. As the United States distributor of Viking Kayaks and the accompanying line of paddling and fishing accessories, Yak Gear is distributing the newly designed Viking Kayak Profish Reload and the Viking Kayak Profish 400 Lite sit-on-top fishing kayaks.

Three Viking Kayak Profish Reloads ready to launch!
Three Viking Kayak Profish Reloads ready to launch!

About Viking Kayaks

Viking Kayaks has been designing kayaks for the New Zealand market for almost 15 years.  After recent success as a dominant kayak manufacturer in New Zealand due to their unique tracking and stability designs for offshore compatibility, Viking Kayak is now bringing their designs to the United States.

The development of Viking Kayaks is the result of the collaborative efforts of both Stephen Tapp – one of New Zealand’s most well know and experienced kayak anglers – and Grant Montague, owner of Viking Kayaks, New Zealand.  Together, Stephen and Grant have a combined 28 years’ experience manufacturing and designing fishing kayaks.

Viking Kayak Models

The Viking Kayak Profish Reload (14.8 feet long, 29 inches wide, 64 lbs.) is a sit-on-top kayak that is fast, stable, and easy to manage on and off the water.  The Profish is the choice for anglers seeking touring endurance combined with stability. The Profish Reload features the Reload Tackle Pod.  The Reload Tackle Pod System offers the ability to have a fully integrated and removable depth finder, battery, and transducer setup combined with a large tackle storage space. It’s now quick and easy to remove or reload your valuable depth finder, transducer, and tackle – the ultimate in convenience. The Profish Reload will be available in two colors: Grey Mist and Yellow/Black combo.

Viking Kayak Profish Reload
Viking Kayak Profish Reload

Also offered is the Viking Kayak Profish 400 Lite (13.2 feet long, 30.5 inches wide, 54 lbs.).  The Profish 400 is an excellent paddling kayak suitable for long offshore excursions as well as inshore paddles. Being lightweight makes it easy to load on to roof racks and carry to and from the water. The detachable tackle pod option makes setting up for your fishing trip quick and easy. The Profish 400 will be available in two colors: Green/Black combo and Orange/Black combo.

Viking Kayak Profish 400 Lite.  Notice the stability while sitting side-saddle!
Viking Kayak Profish 400 Lite. Notice the stability while sitting side-saddle!

Built for Customized Rigging

Customization is key when rigging fishing kayaks for different types of fishing or individual preferences.  Understanding this, Yak Gear is bringing in the two Viking Kayaks to the United States with the intention that the customer can finish much of the accessory design.  Customization options include varieties of options for seat choice, flush mount rod holder placement, center pod configuration, anchor trolley positioning, and even external mount placement.

Not into rigging for kayak fishing?  The two Viking Kayaks make great recreational and surfing kayaks as well!

Where to Find Viking Kayaks

Austin Kayak, headquartered in Austin, Texas, will be the first retailer to offer the two models of Viking Kayaks. Inquiries about availability can be sent to customer@austinkayak.com or sales@yak-gear.com. Yak Gear will be adding three more retailers to the exclusive list of Viking Kayaks Dealers by 2015.

For more information on the Viking Kayaks Profish Reload and the Viking Kayak Profish 400 Lite, check out the kayak walk around videos below!

Native Ultimate FX Has Landed at ACK!

Native Ultimate FX 15
A solo lime green 15.

Native’s long awaited update to their highly popular hybrid canoe/kayak Ultimate series has landed at the ACK warehouse and for my unwrapping I couldn’t resist going with a St. Patty’s Day Green.

So what’s new on the Native Ultimate FX? A whole lot. I opened up Ultimate FX 15 Solo, but it also comes in a 15 Tandem and a 12 Solo.

The first thing I notice is that it is covered in Native’s Groove Track system. They’ve dotted the Solo FX 15 with a total of 10 tracks, 3 strips along  each side of the hull, one just in front of the seat, two either side of the molded in thwart, and a single 5″ strip on the bow. There’s a good chance you’ll never have to hard mount anything to this kayak.

After counting up the tracks, I start playing with their new high/low seat. The seating system isn’t new per se, as we’ve seen it in models like the Slayer, but it is a new feature for the Ultimate. The 15 is meant to be paddled either solo or tandem and what’s neat is that they came up with a way for the high/low seat slide to different positions to accommodate this, just like in the old 14.5 Ultimate.

If you’re into kayak fishing, camping, or photography, I’d definitely give the Native Ultimate FX Series a look. With the pronounced hump in the middle of the kayak, I imagine it will be even easier to stand in the FX than the old Ultimate model, and it’s got plenty of storage area to hold your gear.

See it for yourself:

You can place your orders for the FX 12, 15 Solo or 15 Tandem here. Let me know what you think of the new FX series by commenting below!

10 Pieces of Advice For 1st Time Paddlers

Giving some advice to a 1st time paddler.
Advice for 1st time paddler.

We asked our Facebook fans, “What’s one piece of advice you’d give to a 1st time paddler?” Some of the responses were serious and some were just downright funny. Here’s 10 of our favorites:

1. Don’t go without wearing your PFD. — Advice from Don P., JT L., Gary L., Lisa W., Billy M., Jonathan B., Travis A., Michael P., Laura B., David F., Alan D., Heath G., Erica H., Eric B., Robert R., Chuck B., Lee H., Bobby C., Robin L. and Randy V.

When 20 paddlers give the same advice, you gotta think it’s important, huh?

2. Relax, breath deeply, and enjoy the view. — Advice from Loretta H.

3. You are going to get wet. Plan on it. — Advice from Don I.

4. Just enjoy yourself! You will never forget it! — Advice from Cathie G.

5. Remember, however far you go, you have to go the same distance to get back. — Advice from JW E.

6. Buy from Austin Kayak. — Advice from John M. Have to agree with this one! :)

7. Bring a fishing pole and enough beer for you and your kayak buddies you’ll meet along the river! — Taylor S.

8. Paddle faster if you hear banjos! — Advice from Norman T.

9. Your paddle is just as important as your kayak. — Advice from David T.

10. Tie your gear down! — Advice from Carla M.

 Share your advice for 1st time paddlers by commenting below! The entire collection of responses can be found here.

You’re Wearing What To Work?

Whether you paddle a canoe, kayak or SUP, we at ACK want you to be safe on the water. The easiest way to do is is by wearing your personal flotation device, or PFD. We’re happy to share this piece about the upcoming Wear Your Life Jacket to Work Day by Rachel Johnson, Executive Director of the National Safe Boating Council.

Many of us spend 40+ hours each week at work. Sometimes it feels like a home away from home. Why not share with your co-workers the importance of boating safety while at work? Join the National Safe Boating Council and hundreds of boating advocates around the world on Friday, May 16 to show how easy it is to wear a life jacket during Wear Your Life Jacket to Work Day. As part of the National Safe Boating Council’s Wear It! campaign, Wear Your Life Jacket to Work Day shows others how easy (and comfortable) wearing a life jacket is, even while at work.

LJTW-Japan

At the National Safe Boating Council, we believe life jacket wear is the simplest strategy to stay safe while boating, fishing, paddling and more. According to recent U.S. Coast Guard statistics, drowning was the reported cause of death in nearly three-fourths of all boating fatalities in 2012. Of those, 85 percent were reported as not wearing their life jackets.

LJTW-Barber Shop(2)However, many boaters choose not to “Wear It!” because they think life jackets are uncomfortable, bulky, and too hot to wear while boating. The good news is that today’s life jackets are much more comfortable, lightweight and stylish than the bulky orange style many boaters know. There are also life jackets that use inflatable technologies which are cool and comfortable. They may resemble a pair of suspenders or a belt pack. And, many even inflate automatically when immersed in water.

Whether you’re working in an office, at a school, in a hospital, at an airport or on a boat, help us promote the importance of life jacket wear by wearing yours at work. Share your photos with us on our Ready, Set, Wear It! Facebook page at Facebook.com/ReadySetWearIt, tweet it to @ReadySetWearIt using #RSWI2014 or email photos to ymoslehian@safeboatingcouncil.org.

The Wear It! campaign is a yearlong effort focused on spreading the message of boating safety and the critical importance of consistent life jacket wear each and every time on the water. The annual campaign brings together boating safety partners around the world to promote consistent life jacket wear and boating safety. In addition to Wear Your Life Jacket to Work Day, other key campaign events include:

  • Ready, Set, Wear It! Life Jacket World Record Day: Participants in cities around the globe will gather to set a world record for the most life jackets worn and inflatable life jackets inflated during the fifth annual event on May 17, 2014. Find out more at ReadySetWearIt.com.
  • National Safe Boating Week: This annual awareness week kicks of the yearlong Wear It! campaign with local boating safety and awareness events taking place around the world. Find out more at SafeBoatingCampaign.com.

If you’d like to do more to help promote the Wear It! message, please join us for our Ready, Set, Wear It! Life Jacket World Record Day. To register an event or to find one in your community, visit ReadySetWearIt.com. Most importantly – every time you go boating, remember to Wear It!

You Saw What?! 10 Interesting On The Water Finds

Canoe Relaxation

We asked our Facebook fans, “What’s the strangest thing you’ve found while out on the water?” As you might imagine, there were some interesting responses. Here were 10 of our favorites on the water finds:

1. A canoe which had been lost in a tornado and floated 30 miles down river. (It was returned to the rightful owner) — Found by James H.

2.  A baby deer! It had fallen off an island in a large lake we were paddling. Several live on it and swim across to forage. It must have been born on the island. It’s mom got our attention by grunting at us and kind of lead us to it while we paddled – until we heard it cry. It was probably a few days old. We aren’t sure how long it had been paddling. Hubby got out – (water was only a few feet deep at the shore) picked it up with one hand and put it on the land. It curled up and fell asleep immediately. We’ve seen it since – growing and doing well. — Found by Jan G.

3. Chupacabra — Found by Gabe G.

4. I found an old Nazi belt buckle while fly fishing in Germany. Also a bowling ball in the same stream! — Found by Kevin I.

5. Bongos, oh yeah and a tongue in a jar! — Found by owners of Diablo Paddlesports

6. I was on a date after a big rain and there was a long-stemmed rose floating in the debris. Too bad my date couldn’t take credit! — Found by Stacey B.

7. Myself — Found by Dave E.

8. A waterproof Digital camera that I still use today.  — Found by John N.

9. 5 baby alligators — Found by Bob M.

10. Brand new Bending Branches paddle. No 1 claimed it. — Found by Rodney M. (he’s a lucky guy!)

So what have you found out on the water during your paddles? Let us know by commenting below! The entire collection of responses can be found here.

Get Your Predator Kayak Moving with the Malone Scupper Cart

by Mike Garcia, an avid kayak angler and paddling cinematographer who you can find on YouTube or at www.AdventureOnTheWater.com.

Not too long ago I picked up a new Malone Scupper Cart and I’ve found it’s made it easy to transport my gear-loaded Predator kayak. Just a reminder that the Predator kayak is quite heavy at 82 lbs and that’s before adding your gear. The Malone Scupper Cart is a great solution for this and very easy to use.

Here’s a short demonstration of the Malone Scupper Cart in action.

Purchase the Malone Scupper Cart here.

 

10 Crazy Questions About Your Outdoor Pastime

Sitka, AK

We asked our Facebook fans, “What’s the craziest thing people ask you about your outdoor hobby?” The answers were incredible! Here’s 10 of our favorites:

1. Where do you pee? — Asked to Tim C.

2. You go out into the ocean in THAT?! — Asked to Christopher H.

3. Don’t you have enough kayaks? — Asked to Kenneth W.

4. What if a shark tips you over? — Asked to Don W.

5. You kayak in the winter? — Asked to Martha B.

6. Aren’t you afraid of tipping over? — Asked to Diana J.

7. You have sonar on that thing? — Asked to Allen M.

8. How does it float with holes in it? — Asked to Howard P.

9. What do you do once you hook a fish? — Asked to David T.

10. What happens if it sinks? — Asked to Brent D.

So have you ever been asked any of these things? Have your own crazy question to add? Let us know by commenting below!

The entire collection of questions can be found here.