IMG_0826I’m still learning the ways of the kayak fishing game and on my most recent adventure was reminded of the importance to not make any assumptions while you’re on the water. Our Graphic Designer Drew and I had the opportunity to join Ryan Schaper and Nate Wilson from our Austin store on a trip down the San Marcos River here in Texas.

The scenery couldn’t be more gorgeous – the green trees hanging over the blue-green water and bright sunny sky made this an ideal day to be out of the office and on the water instead of at my desk. We were on a fleet of Diablo Chupacabras – their stability and low profile make these SUP kayak hybrids ideal for Texas rivers.

When it comes to being on a river, I’m most familiar with the Arkansas River in Colorado where you cruise through a few class III-IV rapids before reaching your calm eddies to fish out of. Ryan mentioned this section of the San Marcos did feature a named rapid (a class I called Cottonseed) which I was pretty stoked about. Apart from this one rapid, the plan was to cruise with current casually dropping our lines as we floated up to fishable looking areas.

IMG_0835When we approached the rapid, I wasn’t paying much attention to the  direction the water was flowing and ended up almost colliding with Ryan – oops! Fortunately for Ryan and all our gear, I made the decision to sacrifice myself and jumped off so I could grab hold of the kayak before anything catastrophic occurred.

Drew also had a run in with this rapid – unfortunately in his case, the rapid pushed him right into a strainer so there was a bit of scrambling from everyone else to grab his gear as it floated past us. Thankfully, there wasn’t too much sacrificed to the river gods – just a few lures and a GoPro accessory or two.

Despite these unplanned swim sessions, our group had a fabulous day of fishing. We reeled in  smallies, largemouth bass, longnose gar, and Guadalupe bass (our state fish). As always, this kayak fishing trip left me wanting more – kayak fishing truly is an addiction 😉

Devyn, Cottonseed’s latest victim